Monday, January 7, 2013

'Junk DNA' Made Visible Before the Final Cut

Research findings from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are shining a light on an important regulatory role performed by the so-called dark matter, or "junk DNA," within each of our genes. The new study reveals snippets of information contained in dark matter that can alter the way a gene is assembled. "These small sequences of genetic information tell the gene how to splice, either by enhancing the splicing process or inhibiting it. The research opens the door for studying the dark matter of genes. And it helps us further understand how mutations or polymorphisms affect the functions of any gene," said study senior author, Zefeng Wang, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.Science Daily - Jan. 7, 2013
Yang Wang, et al.
A complex network of factors with overlapping affinities represses splicing through intronic elements.
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 2012; 20 (1): 36 DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.2459


3 comments:

  1. Actually I read it yesterday but I had some thoughts about it and today I wanted to read it again because it is very well written. netflix account

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am always searching online for articles that can help me. There is obviously a lot to know about this. I think you made some good points in Features also. Keep working, great job!
    bubblegum casting

    ReplyDelete
  3. It was great to see the old printshop and everyone who works there again. I am excited to see a printing business still operating and growing, great job guys
    Best Mattresses According to consumer reports testing

    ReplyDelete